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Archive for April 2009

Army Navy’s “Saints” Video is Extreme Dopeage

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Local LA band Army Navy just released their second single, titled “Saints.” The song is a sweet, guitar-crunching, melody-swinging power-pop number the band has had for a while, recently re-released on their self-titled debut album.

The “Saints” video will smack you upside the head if you’re not paying attention. And if you are paying attention, it will smack you upside the head anyway.

Oh, and a 10-year-old gets drunk.

I’m embedding from YouTube, because the link they’re promoting doesn’t seem to like WordPress. But here’s the link anyway: http://www.vimeo.com/4281275. There’s also an awesome interview/live performance on YouTube everyone should check out at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VuHqSfbPiZA

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Written by Peter Kimmich

April 24, 2009 at 12:28 pm

Posted in Old, stale news

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Song-O-Scope: The Smiths’ “Suffer Little Children”

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Saddleworth MooreReprinted from my Cinema Blend article.

I don’t get goose bumps very often. Occasionally I’ll be sitting alone some cool, quiet night with headphones on, and I will feel a chill, mixed with the tingle of awe that occasionally comes with a really good song. If I had more time to sit still, it might happen more often.

But sometimes it doesn’t have to wait for the right time.

It happened to me the other day, in fact – on a hot day, maneuvering through traffic on the way home from work. And it makes sense, considering the song. It was The Smiths’ “Suffer Little Children,” possibly the creepiest pop song ever written.

This song doesn’t endeavor to be morose like Nine Inch Nails’ “Hurt,” or Halloweeny like Type O Negative’s “Black no. 1” (or any other Type O Negative song…). This one is unassuming, quiet, beautiful and innocent – and entirely haunting. Part of the reason has to do with what it is about.

The last track on The Smiths’ first album is about a series of murders. Specifically the Moors Murders, a string of extremely violent child killings that took place around Manchester in the ‘60s.

Between 1963 and 1965, Scottish stock clerk Ian Brady and his girlfriend, Myra Hindley, persuaded five children between the ages of 10 and 17 to follow them to various places, where Brady mercilessly tortured and then killed them. Hindley watched while Brady raped, hacked and strangled his victims with string or cord, nearly decapitating one of them. The couple then buried the corpses on a dreary field north of the A635 road, west of Oldham, called Saddleworth Moor. Four of the bodies were found over the next twenty years, one never was.
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Written by Peter Kimmich

April 17, 2009 at 12:50 pm

Revelations Rooted in Listening to Office Music

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radioSome random revelations that came from listening to Internet radio stations at work (a work-in-progress, watch for sudden changes):

  1. Thom Yorke definitely seems to have gone through a “whiney, screamy acoustic version” period. Meh.
  2. After a long time, yes, it is possible to be sick of hearing the Beatles.
  3. Pandora can play long sets without repetition, but not that long. I’d say the euphoria dies around the 4-hour mark.
  4. John Mayer sounds like a rock and roll version of Dave Matthews.
  5. David Byrne struggles a bit to hit that high note in “Psycho Killer” when he sings it live, but he’s a badass for not lowering the key.
  6. In any group of people, young and old, there is always the “metal guy,” and he’s not who you think. Don’t let him control the station.
  7. Some ’70s group covered the Rolling Stones’ “19th Nervous Breakdown” and slopped it up, and I don’t know who they are. Must look into this further.
  8. New Order’s “Blue Monday” is catchy, but also long and redundant. I don’t know why so many bands have covered it. Note to self: If I start a band, don’t cover “Blue Monday.”
  9. God, the Strokes are undeniably awesome, and I’ll wall-slam anyone who disagrees. Try me.
  10. Also on the Strokes: Ignorant people sometimes bag on Fab’s drumming, but I believe simple and steady outperforms fancy and flamboyant any day.
  11. The Killers line “I got soul, but I’m not a soldier” is like a grotesque mustard stain on an otherwise halfway decent song. Must write band and complain.
  12. Someone somewhere started a “sad, high-pitched girl singer/pianist” trend, and then everybody started copying it. Boo, hiss.

Written by Peter Kimmich

April 9, 2009 at 12:09 pm